MMU – Impact Report on Degree Apprenticeships

MMU – Impact Report on Degree Apprenticeships

At UVAC’s national conference on 25th November 2021, colleagues from MMU launched a new report on the impact of the Degree Apprenticeships programme at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Through the programme MMU have worked with more than 500 employers and around 2,500 apprentices since 2015 and have been voted the highest rated university provider for the past three years. MMU therefore thought the time was right to review the impact of degree apprenticeships, to understand whether they deliver on their promises and if there is any learning for the future.

The key findings of the “Force for Change” report are:
1. Degree apprenticeships are directly supporting young people, with more than half of MMU students being under 24 when they start their programme (more than a third are under 20)
2. They are a powerful vehicle for social mobility and increasing opportunities for disadvantaged students
more than 40 per cent of MMU students are from the first generation in their family to go to University
3. 36 per cent are from the most deprived areas
4. 19 per cent are from BME communities (up from 10 per cent when MMU first started the programme)
5. 34 per cent of STEM apprentices are women (compared to the national average of 22 per cent)
6. MMU apprentices are succeeding in their careers, with many gaining a second chance for lifelong learning, reskilling and levelling up;
7. MMU overall achievement rate is 83 per cent
8. 78 per cent of apprentices received a pay rise during their programme
9. 64 per cent received a promotion during their programme
10. MMU Digital Technology Solutions graduates are earning more than double the average salary of their counterparts on equivalent undergraduate courses, even outstripping those on the top two or three courses in the country.
11. MMU apprenticeships are helping employers recruit and develop the skills they need, with a survey of our partner businesses scoring very highly on growing talent, bringing knowledge into the organisation, encouraging career progression and reducing skills shortages. For example, IBM have told MMU that degree apprenticeships allow them to attract a pipeline of diverse talent that they find essential for innovation. They say their clients want apprentices to not just develop technical skills but also be included in the implementation of solutions.

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